Recruiting 2016-2017 OUR Ambassadors!

3 ambassadors speaking to a room full of students

OUR Ambassadors speaking with interested undergrads

Are you a current undergraduate student (first year, sophomore, or junior) with experience finding creative answers to questions in your field? Do you enjoy talking about your creative work, entrepreneurship, or research? Would you like to have access to professional and leadership development opportunities? Are you interested in helping to support and expand the work of the Office for Undergraduate Research (OUR)

If so, apply to become an OUR Ambassador! Please complete the application by April 5, 2016 (don’t forget to send a copy of your resume to our@unc.edu).

The OUR Ambassadors Program is designed to:

  • Build a cohort of student ambassadors to support and enhance the work of the Office for Undergraduate Research – from art to biology to policy
  • Create opportunities for students to help build a community of undergraduate researchers throughout UNC
  • Provide peer mentors to incoming and current students interested in creative solutions through projects and research
  • Offer professional and leadership development opportunities to OUR Ambassadors
  • Assist OUR in developing fundraising activities

You can read about some of our current Ambassadors here.

Requirements:

  • Complete application and interview process
  • Meet 3-5 times during the academic year with OUR staff for program planning and professional development
  • Commit 15-20 hours/semester to Ambassador activities. In addition to Ambassador meetings, you might mentor current and incoming students, participate in panels or present in classes about undergraduate research, and engage in other outreach activities, including fundraising

If you have any questions, email us at our@unc.edu.

A Different Kind of Semester — Research at a North Carolina Field Site

– written by Andrea Stewart, OUR Ambassador and Environmental Science major

The Institute for the Environment at UNC is praised for its network of field sites, where students can venture for a semester in North Carolina or abroad and do coursework, take field trips, hold internships, and perform group research projects. As an environmental science major with a concentration in natural resources and conservation, I chose the Highlands Field Site, a beautiful place in the NC mountains known for its high biodiversity. Little did I know that through this program, I would have the opportunity to study at Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory, home to one of the oldest continuous environmental studies in North America.

A waterfall in the experimental watershed

A waterfall in the experimental watershed

I was assigned a research internship at Coweeta and visited the lab several times each week in the fall semester of my junior year. My mentor was an ecologist who is interested in studying the effects of logging on forest vegetation dynamics. Research at Coweeta usually focuses on one or more watersheds, or areas of land where all the water flows to the same location. In our study, we examined a watershed that was partially logged by researchers in the 1950s. We asked – how was this forest changed over the past 60 years?

To answer that question, I trekked into the field, a mountainous forest that ranged in elevation over 1300 feet. I located large plots that were established in the 1930s to measure vegetation. One by one, I measured and identified all the trees in these plots, careful to record the data accurately, not get tangled in rhododendron shrubs, and watch out for black bears! Considering that Coweeta is located in a temperate rainforest, the work outdoors was not always easy, but it was very informative. I learned to identify many tree species, observe vegetation patterns, and recognize different forest ecotypes, skills that I could not have gained by simply reading a textbook.

Measuring tree diameter at Coweeta Lab

Measuring tree diameter at Coweeta Lab

After completing the field work, we resurrected historical data from the 1930s and 1950s and compared it with our data. We also used similar data from a watershed that was completely logged and a watershed that was unaltered by humans. I was surprised to discover that, in some ways, partially logging affects the characteristics of a forest significantly less than clearcutting. We also observed that forest hydrology is not significantly changed due to partial logging, a finding that has important implications for water sustainability.

My internship at Coweeta Hydrologic Lab through the Highlands Field Site was an exceptional introduction to ecological research. This project elucidated for me what exactly “research” looks like and how it is conducted. Furthermore, it helped me solidify my interest in forest ecology and ecohydrology. I encourage all students to consider a research project or independent study at a field site; the experience outside the typical classroom cannot be matched!

Are You Interested in Serving as a 2015-16 OUR Ambassador?

Have you had a substantial undergraduate research experience? Do you enjoy talking about your research, scholarship and/or creative work? Would you like to have access to professional and leadership development opportunities? Are you interested in helping to support and expand the work of the Office for Undergraduate Research?

If so, please consider applying to serve as an OUR Ambassador! We’d like to recruit several additional Ambassadors for the 2015-2016 academic year.

You can read about some of our current Ambassadors here.

Our goals for the program:

  • To build a cohort of student ambassadors to support and enhance the work of the Office for Undergraduate Research
  • To provide opportunities for students to help continue to build a culture of undergraduate research at UNC
  • To provide peer mentors to incoming and current students interested in research
  • To provide professional and leadership development opportunities to OUR Ambassadors
  • To provide assistance to OUR in developing fundraising activities

Requirements:

  • Complete application and interview process
  • Meet 3-5 times during the academic year with OUR staff for program planning and professional development
  • Commit 15-20 hours/semester to Ambassador activities. In addition to Ambassador meetings, you might mentor current and incoming students, participate in panels or present in classes about undergraduate research, and engage in other outreach activities, including fundraising

If you are interested in applying to be an OUR Ambassador for next year, please complete the application on or before March 20, 2015 and email a copy of your current resume.

If you have any questions, email us.

SMART Program Alumna Spotlight

written by Lauren Askew B.S. Biology 2016

edited by Daijha J. Copeland

When I started my first year of college at UNC-Chapel Hill, undergraduate research or a research-related career had never crossed my mind. However, once I decided that I wanted to go to medical school my focus changed. I quickly discovered that it would be helpful to have some lab experience, so I found a research opportunity in Dr. Mara Duncan’s cell biology lab. As I gained more skills and summer approached, Dr. Duncan suggested that I apply for the Science and Math Achievement and Resourcefulness Track (SMART) summer research program. I was accepted into the 8-week program. I remember being both nervous and excited. Each week I spent about 40 hours in the lab and attended 3 meetings: lab meeting, a larger lab meeting with other labs, and a program meeting. I gave two presentations weekly and thus gained confidence in presenting scientific data. The first few weeks of the program were difficult because I was afraid to ask questions. I feared that lab members would think poorly of me. One day a graduate student took me under his wing and encouraged me to ask questions about my project and the projects of other lab members. I acted on the graduate student’s advice and my overall performance in the lab lead to an opportunity to do independent research my sophomore year.

Lauren

LB+ Ampicillin bacterial plate with DamLmnB transformed colonies.

I did research on autophagy in yeast and how it can be initiated during the summer and the following school year. Early in the school year though, I transitioned to a biochemistry lab, and gained a new prospective on the work that I had previously conducted.

During the summer, working in a lab every day was straightforward. Research was my sole responsibility. I found during the school year that conducting research was far more difficult. Expectations were higher and time management was crucial when working with longer experiments. And then there was school work, and other obligations. By the end of my sophomore year, I better understood my capacity, stopped spreading myself so thin, and could better schedule experiments and extracurricular activities.

Lauren Askew before her journal club meeting during her Summer Internship Program (SIP) and John's Hopkins.

Lauren Askew during her Summer Internship Program (SIP) at John’s Hopkins.

Currently, I am doing research at Johns Hopkins for 10 weeks through their Summer Internship Program (SIP). My research is on Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome, a rare genetic condition that causes delayed developmental growth and is characterized by premature rapid aging of the face in early childhood. The goal of my project is to find novel interactions between Zmpste24, a gene that codes for a post-translational enzyme, and other regulatory proteins proven to be involved in premature aging syndromes. The research involves working with mammalian cells and performing a lot of cloning, both of which are new to me.

Getting involved in research has changed my career plans significantly. Instead of pursuing the M.D. path, I plan to obtain an M.D./Ph.D. dual degree in infectious diseases. Although it is possible to do research as an M.D., I want to gain the research skills provided by a doctoral degree to reach my maximum potential as a medical researcher. My research experiences have also made me more interested in academia in the future. I had amazing mentors, who have constantly encouraged me and helped me strive towards excellence. Using the mentoring techniques I gained from my mentors, I have been able to help fellow students in their research projects. I find joy in sharing my knowledge with others and would definitely like to make mentoring others a part of my career.divider

In With the New – OUR Welcomes New Ambassadors

UNC - Chapel Hill with Graham Memorial in the background

The University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill
with Graham Memorial in the background

written by Daijha J. Copeland

As nine ambassadors turned their tassels to officially become Carolina alumni in May, we welcome a new group of highly-qualified and enthusiastic undergraduate researchers. With experiences ranging in disciplines from Art History to Biology to Political Science, our new ambassadors offer a diversity of experiences to share with the Carolina community. These ambassadors have worked on timely projects such as: how specific RNA molecules distribute controls the division of zygotes, the role of suicide in the plays of William Shakespeare, further development in C. elegans, and the development of a thermoelectric vaccine cooler. Check out the ambassadors’ page to get to know all of our ambassadors and the other enriching projects that they have been a part of.

The ambassadors program was created for undergraduate researchers to be used as a resource to advocate for undergraduate research to university leaders and to serve as peer mentors. Ambassadors frequently host meet-and-greets with fellow students and give presentations on research opportunities offered through OUR and the greater university. And of course ambassadors are here to provide information, make faculty introductions, or answer any questions, so feel free to contact them for any assistance navigating Carolina’s research filled world.

If you have research experiences that you would like to share with other undergraduates and would like to apply to be an OUR ambassador, look for the call to apply in early spring. Below are the OUR ambassadors for 2014-2015.

Lauren Askew Biology /Spanish for the Medical Professions Minorlaskew@live.unc.edu

Jordan Bishop Chemistryjwbishop@live.unc.edu

Emily Cerciello Health Policy and Management & Economicscerciello@live.unc.edu

Sarah Cooley Geoscience-Geophysics/ Math and Religious Studies Minorsswcooley@live.unc.edu

Clark Cunningham Chemistry & Biologychcunnin@live.unc.edu

Sarah Faircloth History & Art Historyscfaircl@live.unc.edu

Blake Hauser Environmental Health Sciences & Biologybmhauser@live.unc.edu

David Joyner Political Science & Englishdbjoyner@live.unc.edu

Sloane Miller Environmental Health Science & Engineeringskm0709@live.unc.edu

Rizul Naithani Clinical Laborarory Science/ Chemistry Minor

Layla Quran Global Studies/ Journalism Minorlaylaquran@gmail.com

Sam Resnick Biology/ Chemistry Minor sresnick@live.unc.edu

Jay Zhang Biostatistics & Quantitative Biology/ Chemistry Minorjczhang@email.unc.edu

Zijian (Larry) Zhou Chemistry/ Computer Science Minorzzhou1@live.unc.edu

 

Are you interested in serving as an OUR Ambassador?

Have you had a substantial undergraduate research experience? Do you enjoy talking about your research, scholarship and/or creative work? Would you like to have access to professional and leadership development opportunities? Are you interested in helping to support and expand the work of the Office for Undergraduate Research?

If so, please consider applying to serve as an OUR Ambassador! We’d like to recruit several additional Ambassadors for the 2014-2015 academic year.

You can read about some of our current Ambassadors here.

Our goals for the program:

  • To build a cohort of student ambassadors to support and enhance the work of the Office for Undergraduate Research
  • To provide opportunities for students to help continue to build a culture of undergraduate research at UNC
  • To provide peer mentors to incoming and current students interested in research
  • To provide professional and leadership development opportunities to OUR Ambassadors
  • To provide assistance to OUR in developing fundraising activities

Requirements:

  • Complete application and interview process
  • Meet approximately six times during the academic year with OUR staff for program planning and professional development
  • Commit 15-20 hours/semester to Ambassador activities. In addition to Ambassador meetings, you might mentor current and incoming students, participate in panels or present in classes about undergraduate research, and engage in other outreach activities, including fundraising

If you are interested in applying to be an OUR Ambassador for next year, please complete the application on or before March 18, 2014 and email a copy of your current resume.

If you have any questions, email us.